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Tag Archives: AES

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Paper on Crystalline Silica in after-service amorphous HTIW

When amorphous HTIW products are installed and used in high temperature applications, such as industrial furnaces, at least one face (the hot face) may be exposed to conditions causing the fibres to partially devitrify. Depending on the chemical composition of the fibres and the time and temperature to which the materials are exposed, different stable crystalline phases may form. Read more »

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Alkaline Earth Silicate (AES) Wool

AES wools consist of amorphous fibres produced by melting a combination of CaO, MgO and SiO2. Key features of AES products are low thermal conductivity, low linear shrinkage and low biopersistence.

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Characteristics of High Temperature Insulation Wools

High Temperature Insulation Wools (HTIW) are made of synthetic vitreous or polycrystalline mineral wools. These are defined by a classification temperature above 1000 °C and are typically used at temperatures above 600°C. HTIW are necessary for many high-tech products owing to their versatile characteristics – including, for example, high temperature resistance, low thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, chemical neutrality, great flexibility, low thermal mass and light weight.

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New paper on Alkaline Earth Silicate Wools

“Alkaline earth silicate wools – a new generation of high temperature insulation.” – a paper by Paul Harrison and Bob Brown, advisors to ECFIA – was recently published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology.

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High Temperature Insulation Wool (HTIW)

In the 1950s, the term “Refractory Ceramic Fibre” was coined for the Alumino Silicate Wool (ASW) products developed at this time. On account of their chemical purity and resistance to high temperatures (classification temperature >1000 °C) as well as on the basis of their use in other applications, this definition was made to differentiate these materials from the conventional “mineral wools”.

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